Walter Withers

Walter Withers was an Australian landscape artist and a member of the Heidelberg School of Australian impressionists.

Walter Withers

About Walter Withers

Walter Herbert Withers (22 October 1854 — 13 October 1914) was an Australian landscape artist and a member of the Heidelberg School of Australian impressionists.

Painter, lithographer and teacher, Walter Withers was arguably the most widely experienced member of the Heidelberg School of Australian landscape artists.

He was born in England and studied painting in London at the Royal Academy and South Kensington Schools.

Upon arriving in Melbourne in 1883 he spent 18 months as a swagman doing odd jobs. From 1884 to 1887 he worked as a draughtsman for a firm of litho printers, at the same time attending life drawing classes at the National Gallery of Victoria School.

It was probably in Europe, having returned to London to marry in 1887, that he acquired his interest in Impressionism and the work of James Whistler.

Withers returned to Melbourne in 1889 to work as an illustrator, then joined the Heidelberg School where he was nicknamed ‘The Colonel’, presumably for his orderly ways. He was awarded the Wynne Prize for landscape paintings in 1897 and 1900 and settled in Eltham, Victoria in 1902.

Artist information page for Walter Withers.

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John Russell

John Peter Russell was an Australian painter of impressionist landscapes and seascapes in oils and watercolours.

John Russell

About John Russell

John Peter Russell (16 June 1858 – 30 April 1930) was an Australian impressionist painter. Born and raised in Sydney, Russell moved to Europe in his late teenage years to attend art school. Russell befriended fellow pupil Vincent Van Gogh, and painted the first portrait of the future world-famous artist, now held at the Van Gogh Museum.

A painter of impressionist landscapes and seascapes in oils and watercolours, Russell was fortunate to be born into a wealthy family and was able to indulge him in his two pleasures, painting and travel.

After the death of his father, Russell inherited an annual income of about $6000 and left for London, travelling on the same ship as Tom Roberts.

In London, Russell attended the Sale School and later in Paris attended the Cormon Studio where he met many of the now important young radicals including Van Gogh and Toulouse-Lautrec.

Russell returned to Australia in 1923 without much acclaim; it has only been in recent years that due notice has been given to the significance of his work. His works are held in major galleries in his home country and in Europe.

Artist information page for John Russell.

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Lloyd Rees

Lloyd Rees was an Australian landscape painter who twice won the Wynne Prize for his landscape paintings.

Lloyd Rees

Lloyd Rees, Autumn, Lane Cove, 1937
Autumn, Lane Cove, 1937

About Lloyd Rees

Lloyd Frederic Rees AC CMG (17 March 1895 – 2 December 1988) was an Australian landscape painter who twice won the Wynne Prize for his landscape paintings.

Most of Rees’s works are preoccupied with depicting the effects of light and emphasis is placed on the harmony between man and nature. Rees’s oeuvre is dominated by sketches and paintings, in which the most frequent subject is the built environment in the landscape.

Lloyd Rees was one of Australia’s most widely respected landscape painters.

He commenced his art studies in his native Brisbane before coming to Sydney in 1917 to work in the advertising firm of Smith and Julius where he met a number of other artists.

His Australian landscapes, while based on acute observation and deep affection, have always shown the influence of European traditions, particularly those of Italy and France.

In 1923 Rees left for the first of four trips to Europe. It was after this that his palette became stronger. However, atmosphere was always combined with solidity and structure until failing eyesight made this increasingly difficult.

Water, particularly Sydney Harbour and the Lane Cove River, has been a consistently favourite subject.

Artist information page for Lloyd Rees.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Lloyd Rees, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.